How to Prepare an Oral Research Presentation

 

On October 12, 2021, the Scientific Research Unit - Women’s section- organized a webinar titled How to Prepare an Oral Research Presentation by Dr. Nada Alqarni.

 

Dr. Alqarni started her presentation by guiding her audience to think about their target. “Think about what you want to achieve and think about how you are going to involve your audience in the presentation”, said Dr. Alqarni. She then illustrated the significance of brainstorming the main ideas, organizing the topics of discussion, getting ready for the presentation and rehearsal.

 

Dr. Alqarni indicated that it is important to capture the listener’s attention in the beginning. Then the presenter should state the purpose of the topic of discussion and present an outline of his/her work. Dr. Alqarni highlighted the importance of presenting the main points one by one in a logical order and making it clear when moving to another point. She indicated that using clear examples to illustrate the key findings is helpful to keep the audience involved in the discussion. In addition, she referred to the use of visual aids to make the presentation more interesting.

 

The webinar focused on five main points. These are: preparing an oral presentation, organizing the content, typical presentation format for research projects, delivering a presentation, and a summary of all the main ideas of discussion. In the end, Dr. Alqarni presented a video where an oral research presentation is delivered, and she explained its points of strengths and weaknesses. The presentation was followed by a discussion on presenting research projects that were nicely and neatly wrapped.

 

The webinar, which was mainly delivered to MA and Ph.D. students and attended by staff members from different faculties at the university, was really informative.


Date: 10/18/2021

Source: Dr. Amal Metwally - Head of Scientific Research Committee

  Dr. Shadma Iffat Rahmatullah delivered a presentation based on her current research study, which was entitled "Are We Ready for Mainstreaming in EFL Classrooms? An Overview of Study". It was presented at the webinar organized by the Language Research Center on November 17, 2021.   Iffat defined and explained "mainstreaming" first. This term, which is commonly used in the United States, refers to the practice of educating students with special needs in regular classes during specific time periods based on their skills, said Iffat. She added that in the Kingdom, the definition has been slightly modified as "educating children with special educational needs in regular education schools and providing them with special education services". She explained the main purpose of "mainstreaming" as to include students with disabilities within the traditional classrooms while giving them the same opportunities as other students to access instructions and to acquire proper academic knowledge and skills quoting from various sources.   The researcher highlighted some previous research conducted by some Saudi Scholars, such as Almousa (2010), which showed that Saudi Arabia was the first country to implement mainstreaming in the education sector. The study by Almousa pinpointed some difficulties associated with Mainstreaming. At the same time, she restated the words of Al-Mousa (2010) while focusing on its significance as well. For example, mainstreaming, if implemented properly, can enhance the quality of education regardless of types of students. Also, in the mainstream environment, students with special needs proved to be more active in terms of interaction and participation, she added.   The researcher explained some other related terms, such as integration and inclusion, adding that integration and mainstreaming are often used interchangeably, while inclusion is used independently.   Iffat highlighted how to prepare mainstream classroom teachers of EFL learners, which includes understanding students' learning skills, training them to meet the students' needs and classroom organization, etc.   Iffat concluded by highlighting some of its implications. She added that mainstreaming needs to be properly understood as it often has a negative connotation. Teachers' lack of knowledge and expertise often influences their classroom attitudes.   The webinar was a great success. Date: 11/17/2021 Source: Faculty of Languages and Translation
  On 15 November 2021, Dr. Eisa Al-Eisa Asiri, who recently returned from Macquarie University in Australia, delivered a webinar to 107 participants organized by the Alumni Unit of the Faculty of Languages and Translation under the coordination of Mohsin Raza Khan. The webinar — titled "The transition from a classroom to a workplace: professional skills for translation students" — introduced participants to the most important professional skills in translation (henceforth TRN) and interpreting (henceforth INT). The webinar was developed to provide students and alumni with additional activities for their professional development, consistent with the intended learning outcomes and labor market developments.   Dr. Asiri began by inquiring of the student participants how to gain advanced TRN and INT knowledge. There was a wide variety of interesting responses. One student said that the best way is to study for a degree in TRN or INT. Dr. Asiri agreed but explained that one must be an avid consumer of source text and target text materials. He emphasized that one must be a good writer and have in-depth cultural knowledge.   Dr. Asiri highlighted several practical terms as a starting point, explaining that translation memory is parts of or complete sentences that have been translated before that can be consulted while translating. In addition, tapping into one's translation memory is helpful when using technological tools for translators and interpreters. He related that most professional translators work with computer-assisted translation tools, and they test as many programs as they can.   Then, Dr. Asiri admonished the students to have an entrepreneurial spirit while showing the pros and cons of working with agencies, working with direct clients, and using portals. He noted that resumes should be ready and updated regularly. He concluded that networking and attending events, conferences, and expos, whether related to the translation industry or not, can play a significant role in finding clients and continuing one's professional development.   At the end of the webinar, Dr. Asiri thanked all alumni, undergrads, and grads who participated, noting that learning doesn't stop on graduation day. Please click here to view a recording of the event. Date: 11/16/2021 Source: Faculty of Languages and Translation
  On Monday, November 8, 2021, King Khalid University celebrated the seventh anniversary of Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques, His Royal Majesty King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud's ascension to the throne. As a part of the celebration, a talk was held on leadership and achievement in theater 6. His Excellency the President of King Khalid University, Prof. Fallah Al-Solamy, led the discussion, which was open to the public.   Representing the Faculty of Languages and Translation — and all programs within — were Vice Dean for Academic Development & Quality, Dr. Abdulrahman Almosa, and Dr. Mona Al-Shehri, who is now the General Supervisor of the Student Training Unit. Of note, Dr. Almosa moderated the event and began by recalling the remarkable development and unprecedented achievements we have witnessed at all economic and social levels. Dr. Al-Shehri echoed Dr. Almosa's sentiments by explaining how the exceptional women empowerment reforms have led to an inclusive approach in their participation in national development.   Also participating in the event were Dean of Graduate Studies, Dr. Ahmed Al-Faya, General Director of the Human Resources Operations Department, Muhammad bin Shaya Al-Nahari, and student Reham Al-Shawal. They all highlighted the substantial improvements made in local governance, urban policy, and youth empowerment stemming from Vision 2030.   All programs in the Faculty of Languages and Translation are committed to implementing its role in the community partnership plan of King Khalid University. Please click here to view a recording of the event. Date: 11/15/2021 Source: Faculty of Languages and Translation
  During the week of November 7, 2021, 3 faculty members participated in a series of webinars — supervised by the Vice Presidency of Graduate Studies and Academic Research and organized by the Scholarship Department — designed to prepare teaching assistants and lecturers for the intense responsibilities and schedule of a doctoral program. On a daily basis, nearly 150 participants engaged in robust and engaging conversations with a team of leading researchers and experienced faculty from King Khalid University.   Representing the Faculty of Languages and Translation were Dr. Munassir Alhamami, Dr. Abdul Wahed Q. Al Zumor, and Dr. Fakieh Alrabai. Dr. Alhamami led off Monday's session with a presentation on research methods, and he highlighted the importance of forming a coherent picture of the research techniques used. Following closely after, Dr. Al Zumor complemented Dr. Alhamami's session by introducing participants to the specific rules, flow, and structure of academic research writing. Concluding the Faculty of Languages and Translation's participation on Wednesday was Dr. Alrabai. He led participants through research methodology and the process of visualizing the implementation of a research project.   Faculty members in all college programs are committed to regularly participating in research-based academic activities to improve our programs' and institutional performance. Date: 11/13/2021 Source: Faculty of Languages and Translation
  Mr. Mohammad Adil conducted a very effective workshop focusing on stress management which was titled A Professional Approach to Reducing Stress Involved in Course Report Writing, on November 10, 2021. The workshop was organized by the Language Research Center. The trainer, along with some basics of course report writing, particularly emphasized how to lessen stress many teachers experience before course report submission. He also emphasized that a professional approach to handling this course report task can easily reduce stress to a great extent.   The session included some brainstorming tasks for the participants. The tasks were based on the relationship between a course coordinator and instructors and how a wrong approach to designing an examination or a quiz could lead to unnecessary stress. In response to the tasks, the participants shared some thought-provoking ideas that every teacher must think of. For example, changing our mentality helps a great deal. We all should avoid downplaying the course report writing job and therefore consider it as an important one.   The trainer emphasized being proactive and working on the report ahead of time, preferably during the semester, not after the final examination. He also showed some examples of how tests, quizzes, and tasks could be aligned with the course learning outcomes in advance and how it could help design tests in a more effective way, eventually reducing stress most teachers experience at the end of every semester.   As regards Course Learning Outcomes (CLO) measurement, the trainer primarily emphasized the "Values" domain, which many instructors have experienced difficulties with. He showed a sample of a survey form that could be used in class to measure the CLOs under "Values".   Adil concluded that we, the instructors, especially the coordinators, work ahead of time by being proactive by designing and aligning. The coordinators should avoid burdening the instructors with tasks they can do easily alone. Also, the instructors should cooperate as well by being available to the coordinator.   The workshop was very engaging and a great success. Please click here to view the workshop booklet. Date: 11/12/2021 Source: Faculty of Languages and Translation