FLT Delivers Innovative Translation Course

In cooperation with the Deanship of Community Service and Continuing Education and under the supervision of Dr. Abdullah Al Melhi, Dean, and represented by Dr. Eyhab A. Bader Eddin, Lecturer, an 18-hour short course titled "Introduction to General Translation" that ended on March 8, 2017, was delivered by the Faculty of Languages and Translation (FLT). The course took place in the Al Qimma room, on the 2nd floor of Building 4, Deanship of Community Service and Continuing Education. Dr. Abdullah Al Melhi asserted that tailored, in-depth short courses aligned with market demand provide invaluable knowledge acquisition opportunities.

The trainees were mainly English teachers from the Ministry of Education. Some trainees were from the military sector while a few were from the Ministry of Health. The course was given by Dr. Eyhab A. Bader Eddin, a qualified expert in translation with prior first-hand experience in the European Union and United Nations. The trainer broke down the essential components of translation for the trainees so as to simplify things. He kicked off the course with a brief historical overview of translation, moving to the core elements making up translation. The first session saw an introduction to the general characteristic features of English and Arabic statements. Such issues as syntactic mismatch in both languages were touched upon, trying to find some strategies to overcome inherent problems that are puzzling. Session 2 saw how the linguistic phenomena of hyponymy and homonymy in translation are crucial to understanding. An in-depth review of specific issues in lexical semantics occurred in a bid to broaden the reflections of the trainees. The stylistic features of headlines were introduced, adducing evidence from official newspapers. Relevant pie charts were displayed to illustrate the frequency omission of articles occurs.  Attempts were made to translate many headlines in both languages, discussing some important issues of what made a good translation and what spoiled it. Simple translation quality assessment techniques were reviewed. An assignment wrapped up session 2. Session 3 discussed the translation of non-finite clauses, and if-conditional in both languages, demonstrating the resulting nuances of meaning. 

The remaining sessions were devoted to translating short texts, ranging from journalistic, political, and scientific to literary text types. Some time was spent on working out translation problems when dealing with idiomatic expressions and proverbs. Cultural gestalt was copious in the two languages. An assignment was distributed every week to ensure they had understood the topics discussed. Assignments were corrected and returned to ensure students remained actively engaged and committed to improving. Anonymous individual feedback for use in future courses occurred via an evaluation form. The course sun sank with a ceremony during which attendance certificates were distributed to the trainees who attended at least 80% of the entire course.  Dr. Mubarak Al Hamdan, Dean of Community Service, and Dr. Abdullah Al Melhi participated in the closing ceremony and handed over the certificates, wishing all the best of luck.

This is what some participants (anonymous) had to say about the course.

“Active learning has been seen in an interesting environment. Teaching has been conducted in a way that comforts students or learners and attracts them."

"An excellent course, I hope that it continues for several times so that we can benefit from it."

"First thank you so much for this great course. This course changed my ways in translation."

View Lecture 1 by clicking here.

Date: 03-10-2017

Source: Faculty of Languages and Translation

Multimedia Contribution: Anas Al Sharani, FLT Student


Dr. Mihaita Horezeanu delivered a presentation at a seminar organized by the Language Research Center of King Khalid University held on March 21, 2018. His presentation was titled The Gaps that Speak for Themselves or How to Create a Cloze (T). . ., which was primarily based on cloze test and its practical use. Dr. Horezeanu started with a brief history of the cloze test followed by different types and their advantages and disadvantages. While focusing on the advantages and disadvantages of a fixed-rate cloze test, he pointed out the fact that such a test is the easiest for the test writer to make. Such a type of cloze test, however, may result in a number of gaps which are both virtually impossible and unnecessarily difficult for test takers to fill in, he added. He also talked about the modified fixed-ratio cloze and the rational-deletion cloze and their advantages and disadvantages. Dr. Horezeanu also shared his experience in applying some of those tests. He emphasized that to design a rational-deletion cloze test, the teacher or the test writer should think about what he or she intends to assess. He concluded that it is a great challenge for the test writer if the test is to measure ‘the effectiveness of communication’, since communication is a two-way process. He also added, while concluding, that testing and teaching are interrelated and therefore, the best test writer is the teacher himself or herself. The presentation was very informative and overall a great success. Date: 3/21/2018 Source: MD Adil
Dr. Munassir Alhamami, assistant professor, was honored for excellence and achievement in research, service, and extracurricular activities at an awards ceremony held earlier this week. In support and recognition of academic excellence, Rector Al-Solamy congratulated Alhamami for the significance of his contributions and the long-term impact of his research during his time at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa.  Conferred by the Office of the University Vice Presidency for Academic Development and Quality, the Excellence Awards program recognizes faculty who exemplify a commitment to enhancing the university experience for their peers and colleagues. Date: 3/15/2018 Source: Faculty of Languages and Translation
At the seminar held on February 28, 2018, arranged by Language Research Center, Mr. Bandar Altalidi delivered a presentation titled Institutional Fansubbing: A Case Study of the Fansubbing Initiative ‘Autrjim’. His presentation was primarily based on his MA research project. Bandar began his presentation with his research objectives – exploring the decisions and strategies implemented by volunteer translators, studying fansubbers’ attempts to achieve their own goals and focusing on the technical aspects of audiovisual translation and fansubbers’ approach to it. The research also attempted to explore the impact of the procedural and technical consideration followed by Autrjim on its subtitling aims. Bandar, while talking about his literature review, emphasized the fact that audio-visual translation had acquired its own identity and had been used as a standard term in university programs, research, and publications. Fansubbing and amateur translation, Bandar added, were neglected research areas while quoting Pérez-González, 2007. This particularly inspired him to research into Fansubbing. Finally, he defined autrjim and how this group of fans contributed to subtitling videos according to his research findings. The presentation was very informative, and it successfully engaged the participants. Date: 3/1/2018 Source: MD Adil
Lourdes Ortega, Professor of Linguistics at the Department of Linguistics at Georgetown University, delivered a presentation as a part of the Faculty of Language Translation's Webinar Series on February 19, 2018. The webinar, supported by the E-Learning Deanship of King Khalid University, drew a crowd of nearly 170 participants from around the Kingdom.  Ortega’s webinar, entitled “Aptitude and Motivation in Second Language Acquisition,” examined the relationships between aptitude and motivation with a special focus on the best-researched SLA works on motivations and the complex set of constructs that follow. A relatively recent paper that was discussed in the webinar is also Dr. Fakieh Al-Rabai's -- Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics at King Khalid University -- most well-known research article in the field. The 2013 paper, titled The Effects of Teachers’ Motivational Strategies on Learners’ Motivation: A Controlled Investigation of Second Language Acquisition, was cleverly devised as related by Professor Ortega. From the abstract of the webinar: In this webinar, I discuss the wealth of research on aptitude and motivation that has become available in the field of second language acquisition and which can help teachers answer some important questions: Are there special cognitive abilities (aptitude) and certain personal predispositions (motivation) that could help explain the large difference we all see in how successful students are in learning a new language in our classrooms? How much does the surrounding environment contribute to shaping aptitude and motivation: the classroom, family and peers, a society's message about the new language, its value, and its difficulty? And to what extent can aptitude and motivation to learn a new language change with experiences inside and outside of the classroom? I also point at ways in which this research can help language teachers strategize so they can support their students' aptitude and motivation and enhance their odds of lasting success with English, in the language classroom and beyond. Delivering official closing remarks, Dr. Munassir Alhamami, Chairman, advised participants to implement the lessons learned during the webinar. Ortega’s academic and research interests are broadly in second language acquisition, particularly sociocognitive and educational dimensions in adult classroom settings. Her research utilizes insights from bilingualism and from usage-based linguistics to the investigation of second language development. Date: 2-19-2018 Source: Faculty of Languages and Translation
Under the patronage of Dr. Abdullah Al-Melhi, Dean, and the supervision of Dr. Mohammed S. Assiri, Vice Dean for Academic Development & Quality, the E-Learning Unit of the faculty organized the “12th E-Learning Awareness Campaign” for level 1 department students from Sunday, February 11, 2018 to Thursday, February 15, 2018.  Appreciating the efforts of the E-Learning Unit for organizing the campaign, Dr. Mohammed S. Assiri, Vice Dean for Academic Development & Quality, said that these are the types of activities that help students attain academic excellence. Dr. Munassir Alhamami, Chairman, accompanied the E-Learning Unit team during the awareness campaign in some of the classes. Dr. Munassir provided simultaneous translation wherever it was required.    Mr. Mohsin Raza Khan, FLT E-Learning Unit Supervisor, said that the awareness campaign aimed to make level 1 students aware of the necessity and practical use of the King Khalid University E-Learning system (Blackboard).  "To achieve the aim of the campaign, students were contacted individually in their respective classrooms. An e-learning booth was set up, and e-learning brochures and booklets were distributed," said Mr. Khan. Furthermore, he stated, "The Campaign encouraged students to use Blackboard effectively. We were excited that students actively participated in the campaign." The Faculty of Languages and Translation offers a round of applause to the following individuals for their significant contributions and involvement: Mr. Jawed Ahmed Mr. Kamluddin Mr. Matthew Paul Dr. Mohamed Asif Ishfaq Date: 2-18-2018 Source: E-Learning Unit Multimedia Contribution: Javed Ahmed