FLT Delivers Innovative Translation Course

In cooperation with the Deanship of Community Service and Continuing Education and under the supervision of Dr. Abdullah Al Melhi, Dean, and represented by Dr. Eyhab A. Bader Eddin, Lecturer, an 18-hour short course titled "Introduction to General Translation" that ended on March 8, 2017, was delivered by the Faculty of Languages and Translation (FLT). The course took place in the Al Qimma room, on the 2nd floor of Building 4, Deanship of Community Service and Continuing Education. Dr. Abdullah Al Melhi asserted that tailored, in-depth short courses aligned with market demand provide invaluable knowledge acquisition opportunities.

The trainees were mainly English teachers from the Ministry of Education. Some trainees were from the military sector while a few were from the Ministry of Health. The course was given by Dr. Eyhab A. Bader Eddin, a qualified expert in translation with prior first-hand experience in the European Union and United Nations. The trainer broke down the essential components of translation for the trainees so as to simplify things. He kicked off the course with a brief historical overview of translation, moving to the core elements making up translation. The first session saw an introduction to the general characteristic features of English and Arabic statements. Such issues as syntactic mismatch in both languages were touched upon, trying to find some strategies to overcome inherent problems that are puzzling. Session 2 saw how the linguistic phenomena of hyponymy and homonymy in translation are crucial to understanding. An in-depth review of specific issues in lexical semantics occurred in a bid to broaden the reflections of the trainees. The stylistic features of headlines were introduced, adducing evidence from official newspapers. Relevant pie charts were displayed to illustrate the frequency omission of articles occurs.  Attempts were made to translate many headlines in both languages, discussing some important issues of what made a good translation and what spoiled it. Simple translation quality assessment techniques were reviewed. An assignment wrapped up session 2. Session 3 discussed the translation of non-finite clauses, and if-conditional in both languages, demonstrating the resulting nuances of meaning. 

The remaining sessions were devoted to translating short texts, ranging from journalistic, political, and scientific to literary text types. Some time was spent on working out translation problems when dealing with idiomatic expressions and proverbs. Cultural gestalt was copious in the two languages. An assignment was distributed every week to ensure they had understood the topics discussed. Assignments were corrected and returned to ensure students remained actively engaged and committed to improving. Anonymous individual feedback for use in future courses occurred via an evaluation form. The course sun sank with a ceremony during which attendance certificates were distributed to the trainees who attended at least 80% of the entire course.  Dr. Mubarak Al Hamdan, Dean of Community Service, and Dr. Abdullah Al Melhi participated in the closing ceremony and handed over the certificates, wishing all the best of luck.

This is what some participants (anonymous) had to say about the course.

“Active learning has been seen in an interesting environment. Teaching has been conducted in a way that comforts students or learners and attracts them."

"An excellent course, I hope that it continues for several times so that we can benefit from it."

"First thank you so much for this great course. This course changed my ways in translation."

View Lecture 1 by clicking here.


Date: 03-10-2017

Source: Faculty of Languages and Translation

Multimedia Contribution: Anas Al Sharani, FLT Student

 

Dr. Mohammed Alward received an appreciation letter from our Dean, Dr. Abdullah Al-Melhi‎, for his design of a calculator using Microsoft Excel. Dr. Alward’s calculator has proven to be a time and effort saving tool in producing grade distributions that are necessary for completing course reports. Congratulations to Dr. Mohammed Alward and special thanks to Dr. Abdullah Al-Melhi‎ Date: 6/5/2018 Source: Dr. Mohammed Shuaib Assiri
The 13th Annual Research Day was held on April 04, 2018 under the supervision of the Dean, Dr. Abdullah Al-Melhi, and the Director of the Language Research Center, Dr. Ismail Al-Refaai. This event successfully achieved 3rd place according to the evaluation made by the Deanship of Scientific Research, King Khalid University. This success was the result of dedicated efforts made by the members of the organizing committee led by Dr. Abdullah M. Al Melhi and Dr. Ismail Al-Refaai. The committee members included Erich Beer, Javed Ahmed, Mohammad Adil Siddique, Mohammad Sherajul Islam, Sayed Karim, Salahud Din Abdul Rab, and Shahrear Talukder from the male campus. From the female campus, Amal Abdelsattar Metwally and Ivy Sultana exceptionally organized and coordinated the event. In total, there were 17 oral presentations and 10 poster displays. Date: 4/27/18 Source: Mohammad Adil Siddique & Salahud Din Abdul Rab
On April 25, 2018, the Department of English at the Faculty of Languages and Translation organized a farewell party in honor of the faculty members who are leaving. The ceremony began with a welcome speech by Dr. Abdullah Al-Melhi, Dean of the Faculty of Languages and Translation. He praised all the departing faculty members who had made a substantial contribution to the college with their sincerity and dedication. Dr. Al-Melhi expressed his mixed feeling of sadness and happiness. “Though we are sad, at the same time we are happy that you will be meeting your original family. You will reunite with your family, which is very important,” said Dr. Al-Melhi while encouraging the departing faculty members. He emphasized that change is part of life and opens new opportunities and possibilities. The college, Dr. Al-Melhi said, would always remember them for the profound impact they made. One of the departing faculty members, Mr. Muhammad Saiful Islam, later delivered a speech on behalf of the rest. He shared the pleasant memories associated with his teaching experience over the past ten years in the Faculty of Languages and Translation. He talked about the amazing teacher-student relationship at KKU and praised his Saudi colleagues as well as those of his and other nationalities. “Our Saudi faculty members here are amazing hosts, amazing people, very considerate, very kind. I always felt that I was staying in my own country”, said Mr. Islam. He thanked the college for accepting him and giving him the privilege to teach here. At the close of the ceremony, the faculty members who are leaving were honored with certificates. The departing faculty members were Dr. Mohammed Amin Mekheimer, Dr. Muhammad Gulfraz Abbasi, Dr. Haseeb Ahmed Abdul Majeed, Dr. Manoj Kumar Yadav, Mr. Muhammad Saiful Islam, Mr. Mohammad Sherajul Islam, Mr. Weatherford Braden Thomson, Mr. Shamsur Rab Khan, Mr. Rehan Khan, Mr. Md Shahrear Talukder, Mr. Matthew Paul and Mr. Gavin Phillip Louch. Date: 4/30/2018 Source: Mr. Mohammad Adil Siddique
On April 25, 2018, the Language Research Center of King Khalid University organized a seminar that included a presentation by Dr. Mohammad Osman titled Humor is Mark Twain’s Fiction. Dr. Osman’s presentation highlighted the way humor was expressed in Mark Twain’s fiction. His presentation commenced with a brief introduction to the author with a Hemingway (1935) quote – “All modern American Literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn.” He stated the fact that Twain’s style had a profound impact on American literature. Dr. Osman also explained the difference between humor and satire. Humor, he said, provokes laughter and provides amusement. Satire, he added, ridicules vices, abuses, and highlights shortcomings through sarcasm. Twain’s humor was expressed through his hilarious characters, dialogs, events, and words he chose, said Dr. Osman. He concluded that Twain is usually remembered as perhaps the most celebrated writer in all of American Literature. That's how he was mainly valued in his day, and that's how he tends to be valued today as well. After the seminar, there was a Certificate Award Ceremony in which all the seminar presenters of the academic year 1438-39 were honored with certificates. Date: 4/26/2018 Source: Mr. Mohammad Adil Siddique
On April 18, 2018, the Language Research Center of King Khalid University organized a seminar that included two presentations – The Concept of Poetry: T. S. Eliot versus I. A. Richards by Dr. Manoj Kumar and Re-appropriating Magical Realism in Arabic Narratives by Dr. Mahmoud Radwan. Dr. Manoj’s presentation was based on his study that aimed at highlighting the contradictory opinions on the concept of poetry and how both are suitable and witty to two different readers. In the beginning, he talked about the etymology of the word ‘poetry.’ He stated that this word was derived from the Greek word ‘poiesis’ that means ‘making.’ He discussed in detail the overall concept of poetry. He focused on forms, genres, compositions, etc. Dr. Manoj explained Eliot’s classism and theories of impersonality, and later I.A. Richard’s theory of literary criticism and T.S Eliot. He also compared Eliot’s and Richard’s language of poetry. Dr. Manoj concluded that T.S. Eliot and I. A. Richards belong to the galaxy of critics who are also well known as poets. Dr. Mahmoud Radwan started his presentation by defining Magical Realism. The term, he said, had been coined by Franz Roh in 1925. It denotes, he added, crossing, overlapping and effacing borders between paradoxical codes and elements of realism and fantasy. Dr. Radwan explained the reason why writers embrace Magical Realism. He stated that marginalized native writers utilize Magical Realism as a mold through which they enter the literary mainstream to deconstruct dichotomous paradigms and projected images created by the advocates of the dominant culture, represent their repressed narratives, and recuperate lost and minor voices. Finally, he mentioned Arab writers who were inspired by Magical realism – Naguib Mahfouz, Ghairi Shalabi, Edwar Al-Kharrat, Emile Habibi, Ibrahim Al Kuni and Ghadah Al Samman and so on. Dr. Radwan concluded that re-appropriation of Magical Realism in Arab narratives emerges as an example of how in adopting such a mode, the act of writing becomes an act of survival, rescuing fragments of the Arab culture from oblivion, shedding light on history, tradition, and reality. The seminar was overall a great success. Date: 4/20/2018 Source: Mohammad Adil Siddique Multimedia Source: Dr. Iustin Sfariac and Dr. Mihaita​ Horezeanu