Learning Outcomes

21st Century Teaching and the Global Scale of English

  At a webinar organized by the Language Research Center on February 24, 2021, Ms. Arshi Khatoon presented her topic: 21st Century Teaching and the Global Scale of English. She put emphasis on the dynamics of the most modern concepts of learning and teaching and its proper implementation to have better learning outcomes.   Ms. Khatoon, first, stated the fact that in this global and interconnected world, all learners need new skills and knowledge to be successful in their lives. 21st-century skills are essential for the fulfillment of such success, she added. She quoted David Nunan, "The Global Scale of English represents the most significant advance in performance-based approaches to language learning, teaching and assessment since the development of the Common European Framework of Reference".   Teachers, Ms. Khatoon, said, can use the global scale of English to guide their students properly. The teachers first ask themselves how good their English is, whether they are progressing and what they need to do next. To answer these questions, both teachers and students need to follow the steps of the English learning ecosystem. A teacher should know a clear definition of a particular level of proficiency, alignment between the learning materials and the 'levels' of definitions, and have tacit knowledge of assessment tests designed to profile learners' proficiency across the four basic skills. The Global Scale of English, Ms. Khatoon explained, is an accurate, standardized scale that measures English language proficiency. Unlike other frameworks, this particular scale identifies what a learner can do at each point on the scale across the four skills. The purpose of the scale, she said, is designed to motivate learners.   She focused on Learning and Innovation Skills that comprise 4Cs – Critical thinking, communication, collaboration and creativity. These skills help students thrive in their working lives. These 4Cs help students have opportunities in advance to develop basic skills or foundation knowledge. They also ensure that students have proper academic, social-emotional, and workforce skills to be successful.   The key elements of 21st-century learning help students prepare for their future jobs independently. She, therefore, emphasized that lessons should be designed according to the 21st-century theme.   Ms. Khatoon concluded that students need the ability to think critically and creatively, collaborate with others and communicate clearly.   The webinar was a great success with active participation from students and faculty members of the undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate programs. Date: 2-25-2021 Source: Mohammad Adil Siddique
English

Probing into the Holistic and Atomistic Ways of Learning Adopted by Students at the Tertiary Level

  On 25 November 2020, a webinar was organized by the Language Research Center of the Faculty of Languages and Translation that addressed the importance of teaching for quality learning entitled "Probing into the Holistic and Atomistic Ways of Learning Adopted by Students at the Tertiary Level." At the beginning of the webinar, Ms. Tanzina Halim and Ms. Shanjida Halim began with quotations by Tyler (2013) and Taba (1962), who emphasized the importance of students' ability to transfer teaching to their lives outside school and focused on why real teaching should be given preference over memorizing facts.   The presenters introduced their topic by labeling learning as dependent on a complex interaction of factors. In this way, there are different approaches to learning conditioned by concepts of learning. They differentiated the two central concepts – Holistic and Atomistic approaches. When the approach is holistic, they said, a learner preserves a structure and focuses on the whole in relation to the parts. On the other hand, the atomistic approach allows a learner to distort the structure, focusing on the parts. The former, they added, is an in-depth approach to learning and the latter, on the other hand, is a surface approach that is primarily based on memorization with little emphasis on meaning. As far as the quality of learning is concerned, the presenters labeled the holistic approach more effective. The atomistic approach results in lower quality learning outcomes, they added while quoting Marton & Saljo (1984) and Process & Millar (1989). The presenters explained in detail the characteristics of these two approaches and the factors that affect the learners' approaches to learning at the tertiary level. They focused on the importance of having a proper understanding of 'deep' and 'surface' approaches among educators. They also explained the role of teachers to make learning engaging and changing learners from passive to active.   They concluded that learning is the acquisition of new concepts and beliefs. It was suggested that there is a need for reframing how educators understand 'deep' and 'surface' approaches. The webinar was very interactive yielding insights into a better understanding of effective teaching with better learning outcomes. It was well-structured, insightful, and rich in content with the active participation of both male and female faculty members.   The Bachelor of Arts in English program at the Faculty of Languages and Translation is committed to ensuring that teaching and learning strategies are student-centered and encourage active learning. Date: 11/26/2020 Source: Mohammad Adil Siddique
English

FLT Reflects on Alumni Standardized Test Performance

  Vice Rector of Academic Development and Quality, Dr. Merzin Al-Shahrani, sponsored a learning session entitled "Improving the Outcomes of the Bachelor of Arts in English Program at King Khalid University in the National Center for Assessment (QIYAS)" on Monday, November 18, 2019. The event was co-sponsored by the Deanship of Academic Development and Quality, and hosted by the Faculty of Languages & Translation's senior leadership. In attendance were nearly all faculty members at the main campus and the King Abdullah Road campus via teleconference.   Vice Rector Al-Shahrani began the event by explaining how the Ministry of Education has endeavored to improve the quality of program outcomes in all Saudi universities. Furthermore, he mentioned that educational outcomes are a key focus area of His Excellency, Minister of Education Dr. Hamad Al-Shaikh. The Vice Rector also noted that while institutional accreditation and university ranking are important, outcomes are paramount. The National Center for Assessment has refocused learning outcomes (LOs) under a similar model to the Bologna Process in Europe, which places all emphasis on LOs. By drawing from the Bologna Process key domain areas: Cognitive achievement (essential knowledge), behavior (skills and abilities) and affectivity (attitudes, values or beliefs), LOs will be greatly enhanced. Vice Rector Al-Shahrani then covered the main components and sub-components of the LOs that should be integral to our undergraduate program. The national standardized examination for English teachers reflects these LOs. Alumni performance on this exam is extremely important for career opportunities with the Ministry of Education. The test score parameters are:   Linguistics (15%); Applied Linguistics (12%); Translation (9%); Literature (20%); Language Skills (42%); Research Methods (2%).   Vice Rector Al-Shahrani then turned to the audience and reiterated the importance of adhering to the main components of the LOs. He stressed that our students deserve better learning outcomes that lead to enhanced employment opportunities. He then went through graphs and charts on how the 677 FLT graduates performed on the exam in the year 1440. Although the results were not as favorable as expected, there are promising indicators for potential improvement.   The Vice Rector presented a 'road map' based on teacher actions to improve test scores. Shortly thereafter, a detailed question and answer session began in which Dean Abdullah Al-Melhi expressed his concern for the results and his optimism in the plan for improvement. Vice Dean for Academic Affairs, Dr. Yahya Asiri, and Vice Dean for Academic Development and Quality, Dr. Abdulrahman Almosa, stated that they are also confident in the Bacehlor of Arts in English program's ability to resolve the issue, noting that sub-committees are already being formed to address each deficiency in the program.   There were many tough questions during the Q&A session. For example, the existing basis for the undergraduate program and the required LOs are set forth in the Saudi Arabia Qualifications Framework (SAQF). Vice Rector Al-Shahrani concurred, but he stated that both sets of requirements apply to the undergraduate program. The Vice Rector said that our curriculum must be modified to reflect the current requirements set forth by His Excellency, Minister of Education Dr. Hamad Al-Shaikh. The King Abdullah Road Campus participants made mention of the significant obstacles to overcome in making these changes.   The Bachelor of Arts in English program (BAEP) at the Faculty of Languages and Translation (FLT) is dedicated to providing excellence in all aspects of its education. BAEP, the FLT, its students, and alumni deserve national recognition for the quality of the degree program. The department is determined to reform its curriculum to ensure optimal learning outcomes and better results on standardized national exams. Date: 11/19/2019 Source: Faculty of Languages & Translation
English

FLT E-Learning Supervisor Delivers University-Wide Workshop

  On January 16, 2019, there was a face-to-face 'E-Learning Practitioners Training' organized by the Deanship of E-Learning available to all faculty members on Blackboard, which is one of the premier learning management systems in higher education. E-Learning Supervisor at the Faculty of Languages and Translation, Mohsin Khan, led the online training program. In attendance were some new faculty members from various colleges and locales. Mr. Khan provided some basic instruction for those who were not familiar with King Khalid University’s learning management system, Blackboard. Mr. Khan then conducted a training session in which he focused on the flipped classroom method. 'Blackboard is a powerful tool. If utilized to its maximum capabilities, our students have better learning outcomes and benefit greatly', said Mr. Khan.   Of note, Mr. Khan introduced the standards of the internationally acclaimed and recognized Quality Matters (QM) Rubric. QM provides certification to online courses that demonstrate a commitment to creating an environment of excellence and quality. Mr. Khan discussed how these standards could be implemented in online courses.   E-Learning Training Manager, Mohammed Jarallah, thanked all of the participants for their time and attention. He noted that E-Learning is an increasingly important aspect of higher education. The university is committed to maintaining the highest standards and best practices for modern college-level curriculum. Date: 1/17/2019 Source: Faculty of Languages and Translation
English

Flipped Model Classroom

Mr. Mohsin Raza Khan shared his ideas at a seminar organized by the Language Research Center of King Khalid University on October 11, 2017. In his presentation, which was titled Flipped Model Classroom, he highlighted the effectiveness of a flipped model classroom. A flipped model classroom is, as Mohsin defined,  a pedagogical model in which typical lectures and homework elements are reversed. In his presentation, he mentioned the names of the pioneers (Jon Bergmann and Aaron Sams) of such a model. He illustrated the difference between a traditional classroom and a flipped model one. His illustration showed that a traditional classroom starts with ‘lecture today,' whereas a flipped one with ‘activity today.' It means that students watch lectures at home, but do engaging activities in the classroom. Mohsin emphasized that a flipped model classroom can make our learners more involved in the learning process. Such a model has better learning outcomes, he added. He also mentioned some recent research conducted in Saudi Arabia in this particular area. It is worth noting that King Abdullah Road and Al Samer campus also joined the session online.         The seminar was very informative and interactive, and successful.   Date: 10-11-2017 Source: MD Adil Multimedia Contribution: MD Sirajul Islam
English